Coronavirus (COVID-19)

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Catawba County coronavirus (COVID-19) cases
New Cases Total Cases Completed Vaccinations Deaths
8 19,381 59,982 (38% of residents) 314
Last updated June 22, 2021.
Case numbers are based on test results. Not all cases of COVID-19 are tested,
so this does not represent the total number of people who have or had COVID-19.


Questions? Get the facts.

Frequently Asked Questions NC DHHS Website

Frequently Asked Questions Printable Handout

North Carolina COVID-19 Hotline: 1-866-462-3821

North Carolina COVID-19 Email: ncresponse@dhhs.nc.gov

North Carolina COVID-19 Online Chat: www.ncpoisoncontrol.org

NC 2-1-1: Governor Roy Cooper announced NC 2-1-1 by United Way of North Carolina as a resource for people to call for assistance related to the COVID-19 coronavirus. NC 2-1-1 is an information and referral service that families and individuals can call to obtain free and confidential information on health and human services resources within their community. NC 2-1-1 operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year and resources are available in most languages. North Carolinians can text COVIDNC to 898211 to receive general information and updates about COVID-19. Sign up now to get regular alerts on the rapidly evolving situation and North Carolina’s response.

Comprehensive coronavirus (COVID-19) information and situation updates

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-Coronavirus (COVID-19)
Includes national case counts and prevention guidance.

Coronavirus Disease Response in North Carolina (NCDHHS)
Includes North Carolina case counts, prevention guidance and statewide actions to combat coronavirus.

Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)-World Health Organization
Includes facts, maps, and global case count information.

Preventing coronavirus (COVID-19): Current guidance
The steps to prevent coronavirus transmission are similar to the steps to prevent other respiratory illnesses, like the flu. The following are measures we can all take to protect ourselves and our community from getting and spreading respiratory illnesses.

  • Wash hands frequently with soap and water, and for at least 20 seconds each time.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are ill.
  • Practice social distancing in public when possible by maintaining a 6 foot distance from others.
  • Stay home if you are sick.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.
  • Do not reuse tissue after coughing, sneezing, or blowing your nose.
  • Clean and disinfect surfaces that are frequently touched.
  • It is also good practice to start being more aware of the number of times a day your hands touch an object or hard surface and then touch your face without being washed. Limiting the exposure of your nose, mouth and eyes to unwashed hands can help to protect from the spread of all germs and illnesses.
  • For pregnant women and children, review the information and guidance available on the CDC website.

High Risk Individuals
Based on currently available information and clinical expertise, older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions might be at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.

Based upon available information to date, those at high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19 include:

  • People aged 65 years and older
  • People who live in a nursing home or long-term care facility
  • Other high-risk conditions could include:
    • People with chronic lung disease or moderate to severe asthma
    • People who have heart disease with complications
    • People who are immunocompromised including cancer treatment
    • People of any age with severe obesity (body mass index (BMI) greater than 40) or certain underlying medical conditions, particularly if not well controlled, such as those with diabetes, renal failure, or liver disease might also be at risk
  • People who are pregnant should be monitored since they are known to be at risk with severe viral illness, however, to date data on COVID-19 has not shown increased risk

Many conditions can cause a person to be immunocompromised, including cancer treatment, bone marrow or organ transplantation, immune deficiencies, poorly controlled HIV or AIDS, and prolonged use of corticosteroids and other immune weakening medications.

Guidance for Specific Settings
NC DHHS provides guidance and resources for a range of stakeholders. Information is changing rapidly and is regularly updated as needed.